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I can no longer reach those high speeds

Reason: You have been overtraining with the sphere (see alsoMy Powerball won't spin past 5000rpm above)

Solution: Reduce your training sessions either in volume or duration.

Detailed Explanation: Like any form of exercise, it is easily possible to overtrain with your Powerball.

In truth, there is no specific [training] schedule timeframe that we can recommend each day; our simple advise is to never exceed your own abilities on the splendid sphere.

Each user is unique and will be able to tolerate a longer or shorter training schedule than another. (Speed ability is not linked to physical arm size either though it does help to have substantial arms and wrists when seeking those elusive high scores.)

For example, we ourselves have regularly spent up to 9 hours each day, from Thursday to Sunday, spinning furiously while demonstrating Powerball at a show without suffering any discomfort or harmful side effect.

Indeed, from my own personal experience, I have always managed my very best scoring during such events on the very last day as my arms, traditionally used to a mere 10-15 minutes work on the sphere each day while sitting in front of my computer, firm up nicely as a result of the hammering received over the 9hr days.

On the contrary, several colleagues will be ready to have their arms amputated on these final days and will be posting miserable scores, sometimes up to 25% less than their personal bests!

If you are finding yourself in a position whereby you have achieved a 13k score and now, a couple of days later, you are struggling to hit 11k or 12k then it is our advice that you take a break from the all out score efforts and settle into some endurance work where you run the ball for sessions of up to 10 minutes at perhaps 60% - 70% of your personal best... after one week of this training, we recommend a 1-2 day break from the ball entirely followed by a hot session where you really go all out for a good score! Following this simple routine will yield new personal bests for 95% of players.

The grip band comes off the ball when I am spinning really fast

Fault: The grip band has become stretched or oiled and slides up on the sphere once the rotor speed builds to a high level.

Solution: Wash the grip band in warm detergent based water.

Detailed Explanation: Using a Powerball over an extended period of time can result in the [otherwise tight] rubber grip band which runs around the spheres equator becoming loose and sloppy.

Whether this actually happens (or not!) is based on;

  • How sweaty your hands are in general
  • How powerful your actual grip is
  • If your hands are naturally clammy/sweaty then, over time, these body oils will penetrate the band and cause it to loosen its otherwise sticky grip on the surface of the sphere. If this does occur on your Powerball then the simple solution is to remove the band and put it into the clothes machine with the next wash or into a sink of hot water with some grease eating washing up liquid. You need to retrieve the nice, sticky characteristic it had when new!

    Likewise, if your general grip is poor (this will improve by using the Powerball by the way!) then you will find that the ball squirms and wriggles in your hand as the inertia builds, causing the grip band to slip upward or downward on the sphere.

    Over time, this will serve to loosen the tightness of the band and it will become sloppy in its ability to fasten itself to the sphere's surface.

    Once again, a quick boil in the washing machine will return the band to its original tight state!

    My Powerball won't spin past 5000rpm

    Reason: The friction between the rotor support band and the internal surface of the sphere shell has been damaged / altered in some way.

    Solution: Open the sphere shell and clean all inner surfaces

    Detailed Explanation: Every new Powerball has a perfect bite that almost perfect resistance to your efforts you'll feel as the rotor support band revolves smoothly around the internal platform on which it sits, driving the rotor speed ever higher with each turn.

    If you use the Powerball correctly and as instructed, maintaining a firm grip on the ball at all times during which the rotor is spinning, then this perfect resistance will remain for many years.

    If, however, you fail to grip the ball FIRMLY during use, then the outer sphere shell will be free to resonate in sympathy with the fierce inertia being generated by the fast spinning, perfectly balanced rotor (this is not a flaw in the ball by the way), a process which has a very negative effect on the actual rotor support band (the white polycarbonate ring which fits around the rotor inside the sphere) and one which will cause minor wear on the band every time this occurs.

    The result of this wear can be seen as a thin layer of very fine plastic powder which, over time, will coat the internal platter on which the rotor support band sits and adversely affect the perfect frictional resistance between the band and the sphere surface, ultimately causing a reduction in the overall speeds achievable on the ball.

    fig_A3

    Fig A: Dust from the rotor support band on the lower sphere half

    (This dust deposit can begin to take place after only a few short days of use, again, depending on how the ball is operated, so product age is often immaterial)

    Worse still, the lovely creamy movement of the ball will diminish and you'll be left with a ball which feels slightly rougher and is certainly noisier than it otherwise should be.

    At the most extreme end of this fault spectrum, the worst possible scenario is that, over time, the metal axle of the rotor will end up literally vulcanising this plastic dust down into the surface of the inner sphere as it spins around with each turn, thus altering dramatically, the perfect surface harmony and therefore the overall frictional resistance between the rotor support band and the sphere and killing any opportunity to achieve a decent speed on the ball in the future.

    In such cases, you will be left with a ball which almost feels as if it has been oiled inside (a definite no no!!) and which will yield miserable scores (often less than 5000rpm!) to even the most skilled operators.

    If you have been guilty of operating the ball while not keeping it firmly gripped at all times then the cure for this problem is actually quite simple;

    Open the ball up (using the following guidelines) and give all inner surfaces a good clean with a soft, dry cloth this will give an instant performance boost.

    fig_B3

    Fig B: Use a soft dry cloth to clean the inner parts

    In extreme cases, (generally in older balls, where this condition has been allowed to prosper unchecked for a lengthy period) where the surface area has become embedded/pitted with the resulting plastic shrapnel from the support band, a very fine sandpaper rubbed over the platter surface will also help to rejuvenate the ball's performance in an instant (P180 grade sandpaper or even a fine emery paper)

    Finally, please be advised that the same performance deterioration may also result from the ingression of foreign matter into the sphere via the exposed area on the base of the ball over time - dust, carpet/clothing fibre, tips of cords etc. these can all be ingested into the chamber in which the rotor support band rotates and cause an alteration in the frictional relationship between the rotor support band and the sphere and cause a significant drop off in speed.

    Once again, if this is found to be the case, simply open the sphere shell and clean all surface areas - this should return the ball to factory condition after a few spins (you may find performance slightly down on previous top speeds while the parts begin to 'bed' in once again but this will be seen to quickly improve after a few short sessions)

    I have oiled my Powerball...

    Reason: The oil has instantly destroyed the internal friction in your Powerball and friction between the rotor support band and the internal sphere surface is that one vital characteristic which helps to convert your wrist action into rotor speed!

    Solution: Open the Powerball and clean ALL component surface areas with a pure isopropyl alcohol solution.

    Detailed Explanation: The principle of operation on your Powerball is based on the resistance that occurs between the rotor support band and the surface of the inner sphere in which it resides - if this resistance is minimised by even a tiny application of oil then the ball will no longer respond to your wrist movements and rotor will spin lifelessly inside the sphere (generally going nowhere and making you very frustrated indeed!)

    If something like this has occurred then you've got to open the ball up (as indicated here) and take it apart to base component level; get some pure alcohol and start cleaning each and every component surface but paying particular attention to the entire rotor support ring and the actual surface areas on the inner sphere on which the rotor support band sits. Make sure you use a pure, non solvent solution (preferably alcohol based to ensure that it evaporates after the process and leaves no residues behind) otherwise you will melt the surface areas.

    So I repeat...no oil...ever!

    How do I open the Powerball?

    Fault: Unit needs to be opened for the purposes of cleaning or replacing the rotor support band.

    Solution: Follow the following video links which will illustrate the two recommended ways to open the ball: 1) Using a Vise 2) Using the hand

    Detailed Explanation: From time to time, you may find it of some benefit to be able to open your Powerball up... whether to give him a quick clean out or simply to replace a worn component inside.

    The outer sphere shell is comprised of two separate halves, both of which have been precision manufactured to allow them snap perfectly together tightly without the need for glue or screws. (There are two screws on the circumference by the way, but these are more cosmetic than anything else and can be discarded if required without causing any harm to the ball afterward).

    The fastest way of opening these halves once they have been joined is to squeeze them at the point at which they meet if this is done as shown in the links above or as recommended below, the two halves will pop audibly and establish themselves into such a position that you can grasp each half with your fingers and pull them apart with ease. You will easily see when you have been successful in this task as the gap between both halves (the little valley running all around the equator line of the ball into which the ridge of the rubber grip band locates), will have increased from approximately 3mm to 5mm.

    Opening using the Vise:

    The quickest way is to lift the rubber grip band slightly at exactly the points where there is no text (that is, at the junction of where the front and back text meets on both sides see fig A as you can see, there is just black space at these 2 points).

    fig_A2

    Fig A: Screw positions

    This will expose the 2 tiny screws on each side without you having to go to the bother to take the band off completely (note: we recommend that you leave the band on the ball at all times while doing this exercise as it will help to protect the surface of the sphere from being scratched)

    fig_B2_copy

    Fig B: Screws exposed by lifting grip-band

    Remove these screws and put them to one side.

    Remove the digital counter or hard plastic cap (depending on the model powerball you own both of these items are attached to the sphere by means of 2 solid plastic clips at their 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions and can be prised off easily by using your nail or a flat headed screwdriver at the end just above where the two holes for the wrist cord are on the spheres body as in Fig C. a quick upward motion will remove it easily.

    fig_A

    Fig C: Digital counter

    Once you have removed the counter or cap, please take the rotor and ensure that either end of the metal axle is pointing down toward those two holes in the spheres surface as in Fig D this is important as it will ensure that when you are squeezing the sphere in the vise that you do not warp the axle with the pressure. The positions of the screw holes are indicated in the image below.

    fig_D2

    Fig D: Rotor aligned with screw holes

    Now, take the Powerball and put him into the vise (fig D) with the jaws of the [vise] resting against these 'blank' areas on the band (where you have just removed the screws from).

    Put the ball down into the vise so that the exact middle or 'equator' of the sphere is sitting snugly in the middle of the jaw surface. Gently close the vise to a point where the ball is now firmly supported. At this point, depending on what kind of a vise you it will literally take just an extra 1/2 turn to maybe a full turn (if the vise gearing is different to our own), and you will hear that 'pop' I am referring to.

    fig_E1

    Fig E: Powerball sitting in a bench vise

    In truth, if your vise is really different to ours, it doesn't matter, just turn the handle until you hear the 'pop' - the material in your Powerball is extremely strong and will flex considerably before it breaks so don't worry about causing harm - you won't unless you are deliberately setting out to crush the little guy in there!

    Once you hear the pop, take him out and you will now be able to manually separate the 2 halves.

    Do the work required and when ready simply press the two halves together with your hands - it will 'snap' back together and your work is done.

    Opening using your hand:

    Once again, lift the rubber grip band slightly at exactly the points where there is no text (that is, at the junction of where the front and back text meets on both sidessee Fig 1A as you can see, there is just a blank space at these 2 points).

    fig_A2

    Fig 1A: Screw positions

    This will expose the 2 tiny screws on each side without you having to go to the bother to take the band off completely (note: we recommend that you leave the band on the ball at all times while doing this exercise as it will help to protect the surface of the sphere from being scratched)

    fig_B2_copy

    Fig 2B: Screws exposed by lifting grip-band

    Remove these screws and put them to one side.

    Remove the digital counter or hard plastic cap (depending on the model powerball you own both of these items are attached to the sphere by means of 2 solid plastic clips at their 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions and can be prised off easily by using your nail or a flat headed screwdriver at the end just above where the two holes for the wrist cord are on the spheres body as in Fig 2C. a quick upward motion will remove it easily.

    fig_A

    Fig C: Digital counter

    Once you have removed the counter or cap, please take the rotor and ensure that either end of the metal axle is pointing down toward those two holes in the spheres surface as in Fig 2D this will keep the axle in a suitable position for what happens next. Take the Powerball and position it so that one of the empty screw holes is sitting on a hard surface such as a table or solid bench. Please leave the grip band on during this process.

    fig_D2

    Fig D: Rotor aligned with screw holes

    The remaining empty screw hole will now be facing the ceiling.

    Holding the ball with one hand, curl up your other hand into a fist and slam it down onto this [empty] screw hole like as if you were angry and were slamming your hand on the desk!! (using the soft under part of the hand as opposed to the knuckles!) please refer to Fig 2E.

    fig_E2

    Fig 2E: Opening the ball with your hand

    This is a similar action to using a vise and should see the two halves 'pop' slightly apart allowing you to open them with your hand thereafter one smart slap is all that it takes.

    Disclaimer: please be careful about how hard you hit the ball! It is important that you do not hurt or damage your hand in the process!

    Finally if you have superhuman strength like Akis (our World record holder!) you will actually be able to pop open your Powerball by simply squeezing him together between your hands and locking your fingers. I have seen him do this but am unable to master the technique myself!


    How can I send my Powerball to you?

    The instructions on this site have been carefully written to cover almost every eventuality that you will possibly come across while using the splendid sphere and as such, it is unlikely that you will ever need to return it to us for repair purposes.

    However, if the worst comes to the very worst and you just cannot repair your injured Powerball, you can always contact us

    Why is it necessary to hold the ball firmly while it is spinning?

    Your shiny new Powerball is a superlative, hand built product which has been precision balanced using an advanced computerized jig to ensure zero vibration at speeds in excess of 16,000rpm.

    However, despite this perfect form, the nature of the design requires that there be a small amount of play (up/down movement) between the rotor and the outer sphere case. (If you really must know why this play is necessary or if you simply like all that technical stuff, then please click here for more details on how your Powerball builds its speed!).

    As the rotor spins, it generates a force called inertia (this is what occurs when you try to alter the direction of a fast spinning metal disc/object the faster you spin, the harder it fights against your efforts!)

    Now, the rotor in your Powerball is indeed perfectly balanced and won't vibrate in any way - however, because of that little bit of up/down play we described earlier, if you fail to grip the ball really firmly during operation (and, say, let it sit loosely in your hand as the rotor spins), what happens is that the inertia being developed will cause the whole sphere to resonate in sympathy, causing degradation of the internal support band on which the rotor itself is suspended. Each time this happens, the polycarbonate rotor support band will shed a fine coat of tiny particles from its surface (plastic dust as it were!), which will end up inside the rotor support band cavity, making your formerly smooth, quite Powerball rough and noisy!

    Over time, this dust accumulates and ends up being pulverized into the sphere's surface by the metal axle with each rotor revolution causing disharmony between the sphere and the support band and ultimately causing significant speed deterioration in the Powerball.

    Moral of the story; keep the Powerball gripped firmly at all times during use!

    Which is the fastest Powerball

    Fault: None

    Solution: If you are seeking the fastest powerball, it will have to be the 250Hz Pro!

    Detailed Explanation: We are regularly asked about the top speeds that each Powerball model is capable of achieving and whether one Powerball within the range is faster than the other.

    In simplified terms, it would be truthful to say that the 250Hz products remain king when it comes to pure outright speed there is nothing faster available on the market at present, for any money!

    These superlative gyros are totally unencumbered by the onboard induction dynamos which are inbuilt on the rotors of the Neon and Techno ranges and are therefore able to offer a faster spin to those seeking all out speed from their shiny spheres.

    Looking at it objectively however, it should also be pointed out that the rotors on both the Techno and Neon ranges have been balanced to the same ultra fine degree as the 250Hz range and, in theory, should be capable of reaching the same dizzying heights in terms of pure outright speed.

    However, in practice, we generally find that the top speeds of these two models will be in or around 2-4% less [than the 250hz] as a result of the induction mechanism on their rotors.

    Not that this makes a huge difference of course; Neon Blue will still hit the mid 15k mark in the right hands it is only above this stratospheric level that the difference between it and the 250Hz Pro will become apparent (and thus far, there has only been one man on the planet who could have been privy to such minute variances!)

    Techno is a further 2-3% slower [than the Neon] as a result of a slightly different internal design on its rotor and can be quite difficult to take over 15k (it will exceed this level of course, but again, only in the right hands).

    The Metal 350Hz; at time of writing, we are offering this product with the high density (heavy) rotor as standard.

    This rotor is almost twice as heavy as the lightweight rotor from which the model range takes its name and so puts down a formidable challenge to those looking for outright speed from the metal range at present. This Powerball generates a monstrous gyroscopic inertia when the rotor is spinning and is extremely difficult to push past 12,000rpm let alone the loftier heights of 13, 14 or 15,000rpm.

    Once again, at time of writing, the highest recorded score we have witnessed is just under 14,000rpm from Akis Krisinelis, our Greek World Record Holder, leaving it well short of the current 250Hz speed record. However, it should be stated that the gyroscopic inertia being inflicted upon the arm and wrist by the 350Hz at 12k is substantially higher than that being generated by the 250Hz at 14k so this is all relative to what you are considering purchasing the ball for.

    Once the lightweight rotor debuts for the 350Hz Metal range, we confidently expect to see Akis somewhere North of 20,000rpm stay tuned!

    Summing up; 250Hz is the fastest, followed by the Neon models in second place and Techno in third. At present, the Metal is more about inertia than speed, but you can expect it to slaughter all speed records once the lightweight rotor appears.

    What is the difference between Powerball and the cheap copies?

    Or; "Why would I bother spending Eur34.99 on 250Hz Powerball 'Pro' when I can buy a gyrotwister, or similar copy product for only Eur19.99?"

    Two kinds of hand gyro exist on the market these days;

    1) The first can be bought in the shops from under USD$20.00 / Eur20.00 - it is generally made in China and is a mass produced product, manufactured in quantities of hundreds of thousands each production run.

    In this gyro, iron axles and cheap plastics are the order of the day.

    These are generally a similar size to powerball and weigh approximately the same. However, that is definitively where all similarity ends.

    The key element of any hand gyroscope is its rotor.

    In the cheap copy product, the rotor is mass produced and is therefore not balanced in any way before being inserted into the outer shell which itself is then glued together. In simple terms, this means that as soon as you activate the gyro, the off balance rotor inside will begin to vibrate strongly and transmit shock waves into your hand and up along your arm the faster you spin the ball.

    As a consequence, these are often called "Vibro" ball or similar, by their manufacturer.

    Apart from limiting the actual top speed the rotor can reach (these gyros can generally reach maximum speeds or around 6000-8000rpm), it also means that your limbs are subjected to a most unpleasant 'shock' sensation at these higher speeds as the vibration from the off balance rotor becomes more intense the faster it spins.

    This, of course, is quite acceptable if you have purchased it as a toy or a game for your children, but not much good if you are looking for an arm workout for sports or fitness purposes or some non impact rehabilitation for a damaged wrist or arm.

    2) Powerball - the second type of gyro on the marketplace and several generations ahead of the other versions, Powerball is a tuned, precision product which has been hand assembled using materials of the highest quality and which features an internal rotor on a stainless steel axle which has been so finely and precisely balanced using advanced computerised jigs that it can reach speeds in excess of 16,000rpm without vibration of any description.

    Powerball's primary focus is as a sports/fitness and rehabilitation instrument and succeeds in this aim as a result of its totally non impact properties. Each Powerball is individually tested before being hand assembled to ensure 100% precision in every component - a time consuming process which adds considerably to the basic build cost of each unit when compared to the mass produced items described above but also one which guarantees superlative quality in the finished product when compared to the mass produced copy items.

    The outer shells in the Powerball product range are also snapped together as opposed to being glued like in the copy gyro which allows each Powerball to be easily and completely refurbished back to factory spec. in the event of accident or wear - the lifetime warranty offered on each unit allowing the user to request a new component, absolutely free of charge, as required.

    Finally, the 'Pro' powerballs are shipped with an extremely accurate inbuilt digital counter/speedmeter to allow the user record and monitor their speed and performance during each session - a valuable addition which add's further benefit to the instrument and keeps it at the very top of its particular marketplace.

    Summary:

    Powerball features

    1. Your new Powerball is a superlative product which has been hand built from start to finish.

    2. Each Powerball is built around a stainless steel rotor axle using only the highest quality plastics.

    3. Before assembly, each rotor (the heart of your new Powerball) will have been clinically balanced on a state of the art computerised jig to ensure absolutely zero vibration at any speed that a human being could be capable of spinning it at - consequently, Powerball can reach speeds in excess of 16,000rpm without missing a beat.

    4. All 'Pro' Powerballs come complete with the current Accura Speed meter V2.0 to ensure precise registration of the rotor speeds achieved during a session.

    5. Your new Powerball is shipped with an unconditional lifetime guarantee - no matter what happens during its life, we repair or replace it without question.

    Copy Product Features

    1. Mass produced in China

    2. The rotors aren't balanced in any manner and so will struggle to reach speeds of 8,000rpm, at which point they are vibrating badly and make the whole experience a less than enjoyable one

    3. Only one of the copies we have come across ('rollerball') has the option of a digital counter. On testing samples of this product, it was quickly established that the counter (a copy of the older Accura Speed V1.0 meter we used before the current model) was presenting completely inaccurate scores to the realtime achievement of the rotor and was found to be reading some 25% off the true [rotor] rotational speed. The other copies have no such facility.

    4. Offered with a basic, conditional, factory warranty (if any)

    (If you do want a product for under Eur20.00 then consider Powerball 250Hz 'regular' (without speed meter - it can be added later) and purchase the best of both worlds: excellent value, perfect, creamy smooth movement as in the rest of the range, unconditional lifetime warranty, the option to add a counter - all for less than Eur20.00)

    Switching rotor direction during a session

    It is possible to switch the direction of the rotor's "Y" axis rotation during a sessionsimply rotate your wrist in the opposite direction to the current one and the rotor will switch in the blinking of an eye.

    Note: Please bear in mind that the rotor is suspended on a polycarbonate ring which can be subjected to significant stress and wear in the event that you chose to switch rotation direction in the middle of a high speed run we recommend that if you must alter direction you do so gently or when the rotor speed has slowed sufficiently in order to preserve the tight, smooth movement of the ball.


    How to attach the wrist strap to your Powerball

    Insert the fine cord tip of the wrist strap into the top hole on the sphere surface as illustrated.Your browser may not support display of this image.

    fig_A1

    Fig A: Thread cord loop through holes in top sphere

    Open the loop out so that it now resembles a hangman's noose.

    fig_B2

    Fig B: Open loop

    Insert the thick portion of the strap into the noose as illustrated.

    fig_C3

    Fig C: Feed strap through loop

    Pull tight - the wrist strap is now fully installed.

    fig_D4

    Fig D: Pull tight

    Can I use Powerball in both hands?

    Absolutely!

    Powerball is designed to spin in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction in either the left or right hand and this be altered while the rotor is stationary or spinning the only caveat is that you don't switch rotor spin direction violently! (it will switch between a clockwise and anticlockwise spin in the blinking of an eye but doing so at high speeds can cause undue wear and stress on the rotor support band and is therefore best avoided!).

    Some experienced Powerballers will also use two Powerballs simultaneously which is an incredible way to train and improve your co-ordination.

    The counter stays at Zero while the rotor is spinning

    Fault: The reed switch on the counter which registers the pulses coming from the magnet in the rotor is faulty or the software in the counter's EPROM has become corrupted.

    Solution: Lift the counter from the ball, remove the circuit board from the rear of the counter which effectively resets the EPROM

    Detailed Description: Should you power up the counter and discover that it is no longer registering the revolutions of the rotor, there are two possible faults;

  • The little reed switch built into the counter has been damaged from a drop or sudden, hard shock to the body of the sphere. There is no effective repair for this and you will require a new counter.
  • The software which converts the magnetic pulses from the rotor into your score on the display has become temporarily corrupted and as a result, the display will remain at "0" regardless of how fast you spin the ball!
  • There is a solution to the second fault;

    Remove the counter (for details on how to do this, please click here). Remove the 6 little fixing screws and pull the board away from the counters body. This will serve to remove the power from the boards components.

    After 30 seconds have elapsed, reattach the board and replace the 6 screws.

    Attach the counter to the ball and the fault should be cured. In the event that this solution fails, please request a new counter for your ball.

    The counter display is blank

    Reason: The display is either faulty or the batteries are exhausted

    Solution: The first step is to check/replace the batteries

    Detailed Explanation: Please remove the counter from the top of the ball

    This can be done using either your finger nail, a small flat headed screw driver or knife blade (exercise care while using either tool!) - the counter is anchored to the ball at the 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions by two plastic tabs (these are molded to the body of the counter) - please insert the tool/nail under the counter body at either of these points and lift upward with a quick, firm action - the counter should pop off. Fig A

    fig_A

    Fig A: Removing the counter unit

    The counter on your Powerball is designed to power down automatically if rotor rotation hasn't been detected for a period exceeding 40 seconds. This feature gives the batteries an expected lifespan of 3-4 years of normal [powerball] use.

    However, in rare circumstances, it is possible that one or both of the two batteries inside the counter could fail (a faulty cell for example), therefore bringing on the premature failure of the counter display and so these must first be tested/replaced before the counter can be considered to be faulty.

    In addition, due to the electronic nature of the counter, it is also possible for a simple data corruption to take place which will cause the display to go blank - once again, while this is rare, we have seen it happen in the past and it is easily corrected as described below.

    Changing the batteries is actually quite an easy task;

    On the back of the counter (the circuit board side) you'll notice 6 small screws (as illustrated in Fig.1 here) - obtain a tiny star (philips) screwdriver and remove these (Fig.B)

    fig_D

    Fig B: Powerball counter - rear view

    The circuit board will now come away from the counter body (Fig.C)

    fig_E

    Fig C: Counter unit dis-assembled

    You'll see the two small batteries (GP377 if your counter is grey in colour / GP392 if the counter is white)

    If you have a voltage meter, conduct a test - the voltage should read between 1.4 and 1.59 on each cell - any lower and there is a risk that the display will begin to fade. These batteries are easily found in any jeweler or office equipment store if required

    Replace and reinstall the screws. If the batteries were found to be ok, the simple action of opening the counter and removing the batteries from contact with the board for even 10 seconds can often cure an errant display - such corruption will be generally reset by removing the power source for a short time like this.

    You can see that, attached to the LCD screen, is a rubber elastomer. This is a small rubber block into which are embedded gold contact wires and which manages the task of connecting the LCD display screen with the counter board with a certain degree of flexibility.

    In some cases, if contact between the LCD screen and this elastomer, or - between the elastomer and the board isn't 100% perfect, it will result in broken or faded characters on the display. Gently removing this and cleaning both sides of the elastomer (we don't recommend that you touch the screen) should result in a perfect display once again.

    The whole job of opening the counter should take approximately 2-3 minutes max and there is nothing inside to pop out or fall out of place.

    Finally, failing success in the above troubleshooting guides, please click here and fill in your details.

    I got 18300 on my Powerball

    Fault: The counter can sometimes generate an inaccurate or corrupt score ranging from 15,000 to 18,000rpm

    Solution: Reset the counter unit (unlikely to be a new World record, Sorry!)

    Detailed Explanation: The Accura digital display supplied with your Powerball is an extremely precise counter which will register the rotor speed accurately throughout the spin range up to an astonishing 19,999rpm.

    As with all logic based devices however, it may, on a very rare occasion, suffer a corruption in terms of the manner in which the data received is interpreted or processed. Unless the counter is genuinely faulty, such a corruption may only occur once in every 1000 spins (if at all).

    Should, however, you find yourself victim of such an instance, you may be pleasantly surprised to note on your counter display, a score reading of, for example, 18351rpm or 17623 or, in fact, any score within a range of 15360 right up to 18998rpm.

    I would particularly highlight the score of 15360rpm as it is indeed the most popular one we have seen resulting from this form of data corruption and has been the cause for many a potential vapor lock or coronary failure around the globe as the excited recipient contemplated the massive achievement displayed before them(before being instantly deflated by reading this FAQ! )

    So, in the event that you see a score that is above 15,000rpm on your Powerball, have a quick click here and take a listen to what a Powerball should sound like at 15,000rpm+ and then contemplate your next course of action;

  • Take a snap if the score immediately. You will need to use a camera that can provide us with an image that will be at least 600 x 600 pixels in size.
  • If the score is going to eventually find itself in one of the Top 10 slots on the Top 100 scoreboard then we will need you to also provide us with a video clip of you achieving a score at least 98% or higher of the value of the one you are presenting to us for approval. (For example if the score in your image was 15000rpm then we would need you to capture a short video clip where the counter has been zeroed and the ball spun up to a minimum 14700rpm and where the counter display is clearly visible with that score.)
  • On receipt of these two items, we will then begin analysis of the score submission and contact you in due course.
  • Good luck!

    How do I replace the battery in the counter?

    Fault: Will show a dead counter display / no digits batteries may be exhausted.

    Solution: Remove the counter from the ball, remove the 6 small screws on the rear board and replace the two batteries.

    Detailed Explanation: Please remove the counter from the top of the ball.

    This can be done using either your finger nail, a small flat headed screw driver or knife blade (exercise care while using either tool!) the counter is anchored to the ball at the 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions by two plastic tabs (these are molded to the body of the counter) please insert the tool/nail under the counter body at either of these points and lift upward with a quick, firm action the counter should pop off.

    fig_A

    Fig A: The Powerball counter unit

    The counter on your Powerball is designed to power down automatically if rotor rotation hasn't been detected for a period exceeding 40 seconds. This feature gives the batteries an expected lifespan of 3-4 years of normal [powerball] use.

    In the event that one or both batteries are exhausted however, changing them is actually quite an easy task;

    1. On the back of the counter (the circuit board side) you'll notice 6 small screws (as illustrated in Fig.B)

    fig_B

    Fig B: rear of Powerball counter unit

    2. You will need to obtain a tiny star (philips) screwdriver and remove these ( Fig.C)

    fig_C

    Fig C: Removing screws from counter unit

    fig_D

    Fig D: Counter screws removed

    3. The circuit board will now come away from the counter body (Fig.E)

    fig_E

    Fig E: Counter unit now disassembled

    4. You'll see the two small batteries (GP377 if your counter is grey in colour / GP392 if the counter is white)

    5. If you have a voltage meter, conduct a test the voltage should read between 1.4 and 1.59 on each cell any lower and there is a risk that the display will begin to fade. These batteries are easily found in any jeweler or office equipment store if required.

    Replace and reinstall the screws.

    Can I add a digital counter to the Techno?

    We are often asked whether or not it is possible to add an LCD counter to the Techno Powerball to supplement the one actually built into the rotor on this model.

    Well, in fact, it is possible to add a counter to the Techno and therefore it is an option that you can specify when ordering this product if required.

    However, the exciting Techno generates a heavy magnetic field during operation which can otherwise effect the very [accurate] performance of our 'accura' range of counters, sometimes invalidating the score you have achieved - (you have been warned :-)

    This option is available for an additional cost to the regular cost of the ball if required - please contact us for more details before placing your order if this feature is required and we will modify it accordingly.

     

    Last Updated on Monday, 16 November 2009 00:56
     

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